Headed Toward Jupiter


SPACE WATCH

Juno spacecraft launch
NASA – The Juno spacecraft, safely enclosed in the payload fairing at the top of an Atlas V rocket, begins its journey to Jupiter with a spectacular midday launch. Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls Aug. 5, 2011

Crowd cheers Juno
At the Press Site at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, about 150 followers of the agency’s Twitter account view the launch of NASA’s Juno planetary probe atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V-551 rocket. The tweeters, in turn, will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. Liftoff was at 12:25 p.m. EDT Aug. 5 from Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The solar-powered spacecraft will orbit Jupiter’s poles 33 times to find out more about the gas giant’s origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere and investigate the existence of a solid planetary core. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. The Juno mission is part of the New Frontiers Program managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft. Launch management for the mission is the responsibility of NASA’s Launch Services Program at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. more> www.nasa.gov/juno. Photo credit: NASA/Fletcher Hildreth

Atlas V Clears the Tower
The United Launch Alliance Atlas V-551 launch vehicle carrying NASA’s Juno planetary probe, its motors blazing, is off to a roaring start on its five-year journey to Jupiter from Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida Photo credit: Courtesy of Scott Andrews Aug. 5, 2011

First Motion
NASA’s Juno planetary probe, enclosed in its payload fairing, begins its five-year journey to Jupiter atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V-551 launch vehicle from Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Liftoff was at 12:25 p.m. EDT Aug. 5. The solar-powered spacecraft will orbit Jupiter’s poles 33 times to find out more about the gas giant’s origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere and investigate the existence of a solid planetary core. Photo credit: NASA/Kenny Allen Aug. 5, 2011

Liftoff! Juno Sets Sail for Jupiter
An Atlas V rocket launches with NASA’s Juno spacecraft from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls Aug. 5, 2011

Launch Day Dawns
As the sun comes up over Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, preparations are under way at Space Launch Complex 41 to launch the United Launch Alliance Atlas V-551 launch vehicle carrying NASA’s Juno spacecraft. Image credit: NASA/Kenny Allen Aug. 5, 2011

Juno Awaits Liftoff
NASA’s Juno spacecraft, enclosed in the payload fairing atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V-551 launch vehicle, arrives at Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Image credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett Aug. 4, 2011

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One response to “Headed Toward Jupiter

  1. Pingback: Headed Toward Jupiter (via the Net economy) | Business, Technology and the Future

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