Category Archives: Product

Blue LED breakthrough for efficient electronics


R&D – OLEDs (organic light emitting diodes) are the latest and greatest in television technology, allowing screens to be extremely thin and even curved, with little blurring of moving objects and a wider range of viewing angles. In these “RGB” displays, each pixel contains red, green and blue modules that shine at different relative brightness to produce any color desired.

But not all OLEDs are created equal.

Phosphorescent OLEDs, also known as PHOLEDs, produce light through a mechanism that is four times more efficient than fluorescent OLEDs. Green and red PHOLEDs are already used in these new TVs—as well as in Samsung and LG smartphones—but the blues are fluorescent. more> http://tinyurl.com/ng4l8uk

Are reports of IBM sale ‘greatly exaggerated?’


By Dan D’Ambrosio – “It’s hard to buy a smartphone that doesn’t have IBM content in it today,” senior technical staff member Mark Jaffe said.

“I have a Samsung Galaxy S4. I think this has nine chips that we make in it.”

If somebody cracked open Jaffe’s smartphone, there would be no chips bearing the IBM logo. That’s by design.

IBM sells to suppliers who sell to manufacturers including Apple Inc. and Samsung Group. IBM has no plans to launch its equivalent of the “Intel Inside” campaign. more> http://tinyurl.com/mtm2mvq

Neuromarketing — You’re Doing It Wrong


By Douglas van Praet – By better understanding the real motives of our decisions we can facilitate a non-zero sum exchange, creating both powerful brands and satisfied customers.

As neuroscientist Read Montague explains, “Evolution has essentially bootstrapped our penchant for intellectual concepts to the same reward circuits that govern our animal appetites.

“The guy who’s on hunger strike for some political cause is still relying on his midbrain dopamine neurons, just like a monkey getting a sweet treat.” more> http://tinyurl.com/p59ffky

Updates from GE


Honey, I Shrunk the World: How Materials Scientists Made the Globe Smaller

GE – Composites are made from alternating layers of fiber and sheets of carbon, plastic or ceramics, kind of like industrial-grade baklava.

When joined together, composites can be tougher and lighter than steel or titanium. “This was a huge, expensive and risky project,” says Shridhar Nath, who leads the composites lab at GE Global Research. “We planned to replace titanium with what is essentially plastic. We were starting from scratch and we did not know how carbon fiber blades would respond to rain, hail, snow and sand, and the large forces inside the engine.”

The bet paid off and GE has, over time, invested billions more in materials science. The composites research delivered a new line of large, fuel efficient jet engines like the GE90 and GEnx, that changed the economics of aviation forever. “The engines essentially opened the globe up to incredibly efficient, twin-powered, wide-body planes,” says David Joyce, president and CEO of GE Aviation.

The latest engine in that family, the GE9X, will power Boeing’s next-generation 777X long-haul jets. Light-weight carbon composites allowed engineers to design an 11-foot fan that can suck a maelstrom of 8,000 pounds of air per second inside the engine. The air will flows into the combustor, where it meets parts made from ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), another breakthrough material developed by GE scientists.

Carbon fiber composites work with cold air at the front of the engine. But CMCs operate in the engine’s hot section, at temperatures where even metals grow soft. The extra heat gained by the ceramics gives the engine more energy to work with and makes it more efficient.

CMCs also have twice the strength and just a third of the weight of their metal counterparts. This allows designers to make parts from them thinner and much lighter, further reducing the weight of the engine. more> http://tinyurl.com/lt5wlnn

Updates from GE


Das Instant Auto: Say Hallo to a Hot Rod Powered by Water

GE – The intriguingly named Quant e-Sportlimousine has been making a splash in Europe, where it was just approved for road use. The electric vehicle can go from 0 to 62 miles per hour in a ridiculous 2.8 seconds, reach a projected top speed of 217 mph, and has a range of 370 miles for one charge, according to its manufacturer, Liechtenstein-based NanoFlowCell AG. Oh, and it’s powered by a saltwater-filled battery.

Unlike traditional batteries, which use solid materials to store and release electricity, flow batteries use charged liquids kept in separate tanks. The charged liquids come into close proximity only during power generation, greatly reducing the possibility of fire. “The safety is much higher and the electrode materials degrade much less during service,” Dr. Grigorii Soloveichik says. “You can re-use them many, many times.”

Soloveichik says flow batteries could hold “tens of kilowatt-hours and up” of energy, since it is the size of the tanks that determines how much power the batteries can store. Besides cars, flow batteries could be used as backup power for commercial and residential systems, store electricity from renewable sources of energy, and also support the power grid. “They can store energy from wind, for example, so power companies can use it when they need it,” Soloveichik says. more> http://tinyurl.com/l5cuos2

Updates from SIEMENS


Why is model-based systems engineering (MBSE) important for aircraft development ?
Siemens – The heart of the problem is that engineering organizations are not set up to tackle the integrated complexity of the current aircraft. In the past, aircraft were simply complicated systems.

Engineers used to develop an aircraft as “a system-of-systems” split into various isolated subsystems. Separate departments would individually design separate subsystems and very often distribute the work according to various Air Transport Association, or ATA, chapter numbers. For example, ATA 32 is Landing Gear and ATA 24 is electrical power.

So, still today in most cases, the complete aircraft development ecosystem, including suppliers and risk-sharing partners or RSPs, still communicates through documents.

How can communicating through documents successfully translate the integrated system functionality and complex dynamic interaction including control software that is the modern-day aircraft?

Well, this so-called “document-based-systems-engineering” is one of the key symptoms that cause these high-end, experienced and professional aerospace organizations to systematically suffer integration problems. more> http://tinyurl.com/qg7zmhw

Related>

What Happened to Motorola


By Ted C. Fishman – Motorola was one of America’s greatest companies, having racked up a stunning record of innovation that continually spawned new businesses, which in turn created enormous wealth.

Motorola had the vision to invest in China long before most multinational companies. It even developed Six Sigma [2], a rigorous process for improving quality that would be embraced by management gurus and change the way companies nearly everywhere operate.

The problems began when management jettisoned a powerful corporate culture that had been inculcated over decades. more> http://tinyurl.com/pt5fv9o