Tag Archives: Wireline

Financialization in telecom


By George Mattathil – With all these things going on, one would think that there would be an earnest effort to find out what is wrong.

Instead, the preoccupation in the media and industry is with “net neutrality” confusion, which the FCC Chairman summed up: “the idea of net neutrality has been discussed for a decade with no lasting results.” more> http://wp.me/p4erPG-5j

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My Rural Broadband Journey


BOOK REVIEW

My Rural Broadband Journey: the one year trail to high-speed, Author: Claire Perez.

By Claire Perez – I wrote a blog about my quest for rural broadband and it is now a book.

I live ten miles from Cornell University and .6 miles from a wired connection to high-speed.  In 2011, wanting to utilize my recent Communications degree from the Park School at Ithaca College, I realized I was doomed without high-speed Internet.

I decided that I would drill down and find out what stood between our home and that wired connection, .6 miles down the road.  I thought a blog would be a good vehicle for recording my findings.

I began locally:  what did our local cable company really mean by a “survey to see how much we would have to pay for a connection? what was the franchise agreement with our local government? and why wasn’t the state and federal government helping me get connected under the rural broadband initiative?”

Day by day, I dug through the Internet and made phone calls to get the answers to these questions.  It wasn’t pretty:  a survey was a peek around the neighborhood by the cable company; the franchise agreement was drawn up in the 1980s before Al Gore and others made Internet a household word; and the state and federal government were sort of helping.

In detail, I recorded this information on my blog.  The blog itself did not see millions of hits but it got around and the hits increased over 100 percent in one years time.  It was tweeted in Great Britain and on Topsy once, a South African said I had guts.  I think there he was referring to all the things I explored and questions I asked.  

I researched and dug:  why did our cable company wire 50 miles in Maine for the same price as 12 miles in upstate?  why isn’t there a comprehensive  plan to connect the country?  and really what is the problem:  is it that we can’t put the collective brains in the US together to solve this problem or is that the invisible hand of the free market keeps pushing the heads of those trying under water as they keep rising to the surface to gasp for air.

In the end, I found assistance through the Tompkins County Legislature’s Special Committee on Broadband.  A group of people researched the issues and made applying for grants through government broadband initiatives doable.  But unless a community has the drive to do such work, the average citizen faces the daily hassles that I recorded in my blog. (The committee’s report is online and could be very useful to other communities seeking solutions to rural broadband.)

As the quest fur rural broadband goes forward, I think of a point one of my professors used to ask us repeatedly at Ithaca College: 

“Why, you’ve got to ask the questions?  And they have to be the right questions?”

more> ruralbroadbandgazette.com

How Verizon lets its copper network decay to force phone customers onto fiber


By Jon Brodkin – Not everyone wants fiber, because, when it comes to voice calls, the newer technology doesn’t have all the benefits of the old copper phone network.

In particular, fiber doesn’t conduct electricity, where copper does. That means when your power goes out, copper landlines might keep working for days or weeks by drawing electricity over the lines, while a phone that relies on fiber will only last as long as its battery. That’s up to eight hours for Verizon’s most widely available backup system.

“Verizon’s efforts to force people off copper in my area of Rhode Island rise to the level of harassment,” Verizon customer Karen Anne Kolling of North Kingstown, Rhode Island, told Ars. more> http://tinyurl.com/o5jvv5n

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The Development of Fixed Broadband Networks


OECD – Content delivery and cloud computing platforms optimize the delivery of content and services across the network. The Internet was designed as an end-to-end network that provided two-way transport between devices and their users at the edge of the network. CDNs are optimized for one-way distribution of video, images, and other content from large content providers such as Netflix or the BBC’s iPlayer to individual users.

Cloud computing is designed to move the computing and storage functionality of the end-user device into the network.

All fixed communications networks share basic economic characteristics. The first is high fixed costs (capital expenditures), both in absolute terms and relative to variable costs (operational expenditures). The numbers vary based on technology and the scale of the network. Under any conditions, though, running a wire into each residence, and linking those last-mile connections through a wired distribution network, is a costly endeavor. In addition to direct expenses, the necessity of digging up streets, gaining access to telephone poles or conduit space, and gaining physical access to homes is a significant burden. more> http://tinyurl.com/lesfj7a

Tragedy of Internet Commons


By George Mattathil – The logical structure of the conflicting area is shown in Internet Commons Architecture. The conflict arises due to the multiplicity of ownership, and lack of commonly accepted sustainable practices.

Unlike the medieval grasslands, different parts of the Internet Commons are owned by different parties. The Internet Commons Architecture is one instance of a simplified logical representation of connections in a data center that is shared. more> http://wp.me/p4erPG-4i

Internet Fast and Slow Lanes


By George Mattathil – Now the economics regarding retail and whole connections. The cost involved in the retail connection is on a per subscriber basis. But the cost of wholesale connections is distributed over all the potential users of the wholesale connection. So wholesale connection is very cost effective, while the retail connections are very cost sensitive.

About performance, which is what the “fast lane” and “slow lane” controversy is about. Depending on the technology, the performance (peak speed, sustained speed, average speed) vary widely. more> http://wp.me/p4erPG-3T

An Internet Transit Map


By George Mattathil – To help clarify the issues, I created an Internet Transit Map. The Internet Transit Map is a simplified logical diagram (“reference model”) of the Internet to provide clarity for discussions about regulating the Internet. more> http://t.co/VQXbKnCLm1